Sunday , May 27 2018
Did you know your guests are probably doing this? Photo Credit: @Oog

Did you know your guests were doing this?

Twitter went into a meltdown over the weekend, after a hotel guest tweeted out a ‘lifehack’ for tricking the in-room card access. 

This twitter user shared a photo of a standard keyless card access point in a guestroom, with a supermarket loyalty card  used to trick the system into turning on the room’s electricity. This allowed the guest to leave the room with their keycard without the electricity automatically switching off.

The simple tweet had people arguing over the mechanism of the in-room card electronic access systems, and why hotels use them.

 

As someone who’s been reporting on the hotel industry for many years, I was shocked that so many people said they had never come across hotels with keyless access systems before… I wasn’t the only person with that sentiment, either:

Lots of people also responded to the viral tweet saying they’d spent years requesting multiple room keys so that they could charge devices and have electricity in their guestroom while they went out. This new ‘hack’ would mean they no longer needed to request multiple keys.

If this is a lifehack that catches on, it’s one that’s quite difficult for property management to monitor or control. But is this something that accom managers are worried about? In terms of energy efficiency, it raises further questions about how to get tourists to care about energy savings.

Did you know guests were doing this?

As a key reason for this tech installation is energy saving, how do you feel about guests ‘overriding’ the system? Is it a lifehack that you think the manufacturers of these products should prevent?

 

About Rosie Clarke

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